November book review round up

I didn’t get through many books this month – only three on my review list. Here’s this month’s selection:

**** “The Resurrection of Frédéric Debreu” by Alex Marsh

***1/2 Marco Polo Spiral Guide – Perfect Days in Prague

****    “Minkie Monster Saves Christmas” by Ceri Clark

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“Love, Life and Logic” by Uday Mukerji released today

screen-shot-2016-07-03-at-12-29-44-pmUday Mukerji’s debut novel “Love Life and Logic” is officially released today!. Uday is our author of the author of the month. Check out the Book Tour page to find out more about him and “Love, Life and Logic”.

Advance Praise for “Love, Life and Logic”

“… highly recommended for those seeking more than a casual romance story. Love, Life and Logic comes packed with thought-provoking mental and spiritual changes, in which the ultimate goal fluidly changes with better understanding.” – Midwest Book Review

“This is a very deep book that will make you think about your own life.” – Books and Movies: Reviews

“If you want a book to help you reflect on the bigger picture of life, this may be the book for you. I found this book to be an interesting read that looks at how the things in your life happen around you and how you make sense of it. The book is one for those who enjoy philosophical thinking.” – Valerie, Goodreads Reviewer

“This is a book for you if you like well-told, and thoughtful stories. If you like ruminating on important matters, you will find food for thought. Love, Life, and Logic is among my favourite five of 2016.” – Karen, Goodreads Reviewer

Review of “Light Room” by Jim Nesbitt

Many thanks to Jim Nesbitt, author of hard-boiled detective novel “The Last Second Chance” and soon to be released “Right Wrong Number” for his review of “Light Room”

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With Light Room, Sarah Jackson spins a short story about a near-future and presumably post-apocalyptic and authoritarian world that harkens back to black-and-white vignettes of The Twilight Zone with one important difference — there’s no Rod Serling giving you an “Imagine, if you will…” introductory scene setter.

Jackson demands the reader to pay attention from jump street and plunges us right into a dialogue-driven story that echoes one of George V. Higgins’ later novels. The telling details are scattered through the thoughts of a prisoner who has committed a heinous crime and a doctor and nurse who are preparing to purify his blood and harvest his organs. Blink and you miss a key point.

The prisoner is mute and can’t speak to the doctor or nurse. All he has is his thoughts. As the doctor and nurse chat about their weekend, upping the prisoner’s sedative and waiting on the next available blood filter machine, more story nuggets are revealed.

We’re in a world where the worst of society are given a number and sent to this glorified and sanitized butcher shop where eyes, kidneys and liver are surgically sliced out and the cadaver is sent to be ground into fertilizer. All revealed in breezy, banal pleasantries mixed with matter-of-fact orders the doctor gives the nurse.

In contrast, the prisoner’s thoughts are a profanity-laced rant against his helplessness. He’s a drug addict, hooked on something called Crazy 8s. He’s also a rapist and murderer who blames his female for provoking him — which seems to mean having the misfortune of walking past and attracting his addled and lethal attention.

Jackson shows a deft hand with pace and the shifts between the prisoner’s thoughts and the conversations of people who act as if he isn’t there, with casually callous comments about what will happen to him next. She also understands the power of ending a short story with an unexpected O. Henry twist.

You can get your copy of “Light Room” via Amazon